Service Tips

State Employee Recognition Day Tips

State Employee Recognition Day is May 8, 2013

The thousands of dedicated individuals who make up the state’s workforce are individuals at all levels of state government who are making a difference for nearly 10 million Georgians every day.

It’s time to show your employees how much you appreciate their service to Georgia.  Anyone can recognize their fellow co-workers and employees, and it doesn’t have to cost much or anything at all.

Here are some low cost, no cost recognition ideas:

  • Thank your employees/coworkers (Personal hand-written notes, Email that can be saved and forwarded, or a verbal “Great Job!” or simple “Thank you!”)
  • Send e-mails to supervisors recognizing their employee (copy the employee)
  • Keep a box of blank cards or cards for different occasions in your desk
  • Establish “Extra Mile” Awards, “Applause” Awards, etc.  Give creative superlatives or titles – Best Phone Voice, Guru of Graphs, Team MVP
  • Recognize birthdays and service anniversaries
  • Give spontaneous high fives or fist bumps
  • Donate goods or services to give as prizes
  • Coordinate an after-work get-together
  • Bring in homemade or store-bought goodies or organize a potluck to recognize a team’s hard work
  • Put employees’ pictures on a bulletin board, or include an article about them in agency newsletters, intranet or internet sites
  • Recognize employees demonstrating the agency’s values
  • Recognize community service and volunteer work
  • Reserve a special parking spot for a deserving employee
  • Tie-in teambuilding activities to recognition
  • Send reminders to employees to recognize each other
  • Award coupons to dress casually
  • Create an employee recognition suggestion box
  • Announce activities across your organization – not just by section or location
  • During team meetings, have members share one thing they value about each team member
  • Give a deserving employee a challenging assignment they requested
  • Consider opportunities for rotational assignments and job shadowing
  • Create computer-generated recognition forms/certificates, signed by senior leader
  • Share compliments from the public with an employee and put a copy in their personnel file
  • Hold a recognition breakfast, lunch, ice cream party or pizza party. Have supervisors and managers set up, serve, and clean up
  • Hold drawings for restaurant, books or music store and movie ticket gift cards
  • Award a “traveling trophy” that is given to a different employee each year
  • Invite a local dignitary or motivational speaker for an event at the office
  • Invite your customers to visit your offices for an after-work drop in to get to know each other better

Recognition is a powerful motivator, and it contributes to higher employee morale, increases organizational productivity, and aids in recruitment and retention.

 

Preparing for Georgia’s Tornado Season

With tornado season peaking between the months of March and May, the Georgia Emergency Management Agency (GEMA), the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and other local emergency agencies are encouraging everyone to start preparing now for these potentially disastrous storms.

GEMA’s Ready Georgia, www.ready.ga.gov, a statewide emergency preparedness campaign, offers tools that residents can use to create an emergency supply kit, develop a communications plan and stay informed about potential threats.

To prepare, plan for and stay informed about tornadoes, Ready Georgia shares the following tips:

Prepare for Tornadoes

  • Familiarize yourself with the terms that are used to identify tornado hazards: a tornado watch means a tornado is possible in your area; a tornado warning means a tornado has been spotted in your area, and you need to take shelter immediately.
  • Determine in advance where you will take shelter in case of a tornado warning.
  • Prepare a Ready Kit of emergency supplies, including a first aid kit, NOAA Weather Radio and a three-day supply of food and water.

Plan to Take Shelter 

  • If local authorities issue a tornado warning or if you see a funnel cloud, take shelter immediately.
  • Storm cellars or basements provide the best protection.
  • If underground shelter is not available, go into an interior room or hallway on the lowest floor possible.
  • In a high-rise building, go to a small interior room or hallway on the lowest floor possible.
  • Stay away from windows, doors and outside walls. Go to the center of the room. Stay away from corners because they attract debris.
  • A vehicle, trailer or mobile home does not provide good protection. Plan to go quickly to a building with a strong foundation, if possible.
  • If shelter is not available, lie flat in a ditch or other low-lying area. Do not get under an overpass or bridge. You are safer in a low, flat location.
  • Stay in the shelter location until the danger has passed.

Stay Informed about Tornadoes

  • Local authorities may not immediately be able to provide information on what is happening and what you should do. However, you should listen to NOAA Weather Radio, watch TV, listen to the radio or check the Internet often for official news and instructions as they become available.
  • After a tornado, be sure to remain out of damaged buildings and stay clear of downed power lines.
  • Help injured or trapped people. Check on others who may require special assistance, such as the elderly, children and people with disabilities.

A few minutes of preparation can save a life or make you far more comfortable in case of an emergency situation.

Workplace Safety Tips From DOAS Risk Management Services

Reducing the Risk of Manual Material Handling

Back injuries account for one of every five injuries or illnesses in the workplace.  Around 80% of these injuries occur to the lower back and are associated with manual material handling tasks. Oftentimes we get drawn into the “let’s get’ er done” attitude with many material handling tasks. The work does need to be completed, but taking a couple of seconds to determine the best way to do the job may prevent weeks of back pain.

When you lift…

DO

  • Plant your feet firmly – get a stable base
  • Keep the load close to your body
  • Bend at your knees – not your waist
  • Tighten your abdominal muscles to support your back
  • Keep your back upright – keep it in its natural posture
  • Use your leg muscles as you lift
  • Get a good grip – use both hands
  • Lift steadily and smoothly without jerking
  • Breathe.  If you must hold your breath to lift it, then it is too heavy

DO NOT

  • Lift from the floor
  • Lift loads across obstacles
  • Twist and lift
  • Lift from an uncomfortable posture
  • Fight to recover a dropped object
  • Lift with one hand (unbalanced)
  • Lift while reaching or stretching
  • Hold your breath while lifting – Get Help

Begin each material handling task with the end in mind:  Where are you going to move it? Do you have a good grip? Is there a clear path?

Let’s work together to make Georgia a safer place to work.