Tips for Preventing Heat-Related Illness

 

Tips for Preventing Heat-Related Illness

Summertime temperatures that are much hotter and/or humid than average create extreme heat. Humid and muggy conditions can make it seem hotter than it really is. Everyone, especially people who work outdoors, should take precautions and follow these safety tips, provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, to avoid heat-related illness.

Stay Cool  

Wear Appropriate Clothing: Choose lightweight, light-colored, loose-fitting clothing.

Stay Cool Indoors: Stay in an air-conditioned place as much as possible. If your home does not have air conditioning, go to the shopping mall or public library—even a few hours spent in air conditioning can help your body stay cooler when you go back into the heat. Call your local health department to see if there are any heat-relief shelters in your area.

  • Keep in mind: Electric fans may provide comfort, but when the temperature is in the high 90s, they will not prevent heat-related illness. Taking a cool shower or bath or moving to an air-conditioned place is a much better way to cool off. Use your stove and oven less to maintain a cooler temperature in your home.

Schedule Outdoor Activities Carefully: Try to limit your outdoor activity to when it’s coolest, like morning and evening hours. Rest often in shady areas so that your body has a chance to recover.

Pace Yourself: Cut down on exercise during the heat. If you’re not accustomed to working or exercising in a hot environment, start slowly and pick up the pace gradually. If exertion in the heat makes your heart pound and leaves you gasping for breath, STOP all activity. Get into a cool area or into the shade, and rest, especially if you become lightheaded, confused, weak, or faint.

Wear Sunscreen: Sunburn affects your body’s ability to cool down and can make you dehydrated. If you must go outdoors, protect yourself from the sun by wearing a wide-brimmed hat, sunglasses, and by putting on sunscreen of SPF 15 or higher 30 minutes prior to going out. Continue to reapply it according to the package directions.

  • Tip:Look for sunscreens that say “broad spectrum” or “UVA/UVB protection” on their labels- these products work best.

Do Not Leave Children in Cars: Cars can quickly heat up to dangerous temperatures, even with a window cracked open. While anyone left in a parked car is at risk, children are especially at risk of getting a heat stroke or dying. When traveling with children, remember to do the following:

  • Never leave infants, children or pets in a parked car, even if the windows are cracked open.
  • To remind yourself that a child is in the car, keep a stuffed animal in the car seat. When the child is buckled in, place the stuffed animal in the front with the driver.
  • When leaving your car, check to be sure everyone is out of the car. Do not overlook any children who have fallen asleep in the car.

Avoid Hot and Heavy Meals: They add heat to your body!

Stay Hydrated

Drink Plenty of Fluids: Drink more fluids, regardless of how active you are. Don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink.

  • Warning:If your doctor limits the amount you drink or has you on water pills, ask how much you should drink while the weather is hot.
  • Stay away from very sugary or alcoholic drinks—these actually cause you to lose more body fluid. Also avoid very cold drinks, because they can cause stomach cramps.

Replace Salt and Minerals: Heavy sweating removes salt and minerals from the body that need to be replaced. A sports drink can replace the salt and minerals you lose in sweat.

  • If you are on a low-salt diet, have diabetes, high blood pressure, or other chronic conditions, talk with your doctor before drinking a sports beverage or taking salt tablets.

Keep Your Pets Hydrated: Provide plenty of fresh water for your pets, and leave the water in a shady area.

If you have to work while it’s hot outside

  • Drink plenty of water, and don’t wait until you are thirsty to drink.
  • Avoid alcohol or liquids containing large amounts of sugar.
  • Wear and reapply sunscreen as indicated on the package.
  • Ask if tasks can be scheduled for earlier or later in the day to avoid midday heat.
  • Wear a brimmed hat and loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Spend time in air-conditioned buildings during breaks and after work.
  • Encourage co-workers to take breaks to cool off and drink water.

WARNING! If you feel faint or weak, stop all activity and get to a cool place.

 

Carrie Ashbee appointed Executive Director of the Georgia Foundation for Early Care and Learning

On April 28, 2017,  Governor Nathan Deal announced the appointment of Carrie Ashbee as the Executive Director of Georgia Foundation for the Early Care and Learning foundation, effective July 1.  Ashbee will oversee the newly created non-profit organization, with the primary purpose of supporting educational excellence for children and families. The program will promote partnerships between businesses, charities, institutions of higher education, local and public school systems and early care and education programs.

Ashbee previously worked in Washington D.C. , holding various positions such as executive assistant and scheduler with then-Congressman Deal.  In 2011, she joined Gov. Deal in Georgia as his executive assistant and later in her current position as Deputy Chief of Staff of Executive Office Operations.  Ashbee graduated from the University of Alabama with a bachelor’s degree in Advertising and Public Relations. She is a native of Marietta, Georgia and currently serves as chair of the Capitol Arts Standards Committee overseeing the implementation of the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. statue on Capitol grounds. Ashbee and her husband, Blake, have one daughter.

I-85 corridor to reopen by May 15

Gov. Nathan Deal, along with Georgia Department of Transportation (GDOT) Commissioner Russell McMurry and State Transportation Board Chairman Robert L. Brown Jr., today announced the reopening of I-85, six weeks after a March 30 fire and bridge collapse closed the corridor. The northbound and southbound lanes of the I-85 bridge over Piedmont Road in Metro Atlanta are projected to open to traffic by morning rush hour on May 15. The new opening date is five weeks ahead of the original projected opening date of June 15.

“While this situation has been a tremendous challenge, the response from the people of Georgia has been nothing less than remarkable,” said Deal. “It is extraordinary that in just six weeks, this critical piece of infrastructure is nearly ready to reopen for motorist use following the fire and bridge collapse. I am grateful to President Trump and Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao for providing the financial assistance necessary to complete the bridge on an expedited timeframe. I’d also like to thank Commissioner Russell McMurry for his leadership throughout this project, as well as the leadership of MARTA, the Georgia Regional Transportation Authority and the State Road and Tollway Authority for leading the charge in providing alternative commute options. Most importantly, I thank the motoring public for their patience and the Atlanta business community for its flexibility. In Georgia, we get things done, and we have risen to the occasion for I-85 to be completed as efficiently and effectively as possible.”

The latest updates on the reopening of I-85 can be found at www.I85rebuild.org or www.dot.ga.gov.