Posts Tagged ‘Risk Management’

Holiday Travel Safety Tips

Are you and your family planning to drive to a holiday get-together this year? As we begin the busiest travel season of the year, the Georgia Department of Administrative Services’ Risk Management Division offers some simple tips to help make your drive to spend time with family and friends a smooth one, so you can arrive at your destination safely and without incident.

  • Check behind vehicles before moving
  • Maintain a safe distance between vehicles
  • Make sure your vehicle is in good repair
  • Reduce speed, especially during inclement weather
  • If you drink, don’t drive
  • Always use safety belts and child safety seats
  • Plan your trip – Give yourself plenty of time and schedule rest stops and activities for small children
  • Leave an itinerary with a friend so that someone will know where you are
  • Keep your cell phone charged
  • Don’t overload your vehicle or obstruct your view with luggage and/or packages
  • Avoid eating heavy meals right before driving, as this can lead to sleepiness
  • Get a good night’s sleep before traveling

In case you encounter inclement weather, carry an emergency kit that contains:

  • First-aid supplies
  • Blankets
  • Flashlight with spare batteries
  • Flares
  • A shovel
  • Quick-energy foods, nutrition bars, or dried fruits and nuts and water
  • Sand, salt or cat litter for traction

Holiday Travel Safety Tips

Are you and your family planning to drive to a holiday get-together this year? As we begin the busiest travel season of the year, the Georgia Department of Administrative ServicesRisk Management Division offers some simple tips to help make your drive to spend time with family and friends a smooth one, so you can arrive at your destination safely and without incident.

  • Check behind vehicles before moving
  • Maintain a safe distance between vehicles
  • Make sure your vehicle is in good repair
  • Reduce speed, especially during inclement weather
  • If you drink, don’t drive
  • Always use safety belts and child safety seats
  • Plan your trip – Give yourself plenty of time and schedule rest stops and activities for small children
  • Leave an itinerary with a friend so that someone will know where you are
  • Keep your cell phone charged
  • Don’t overload your vehicle or obstruct your view with luggage and/or packages
  • Avoid eating heavy meals right before driving, as this can lead to sleepiness
  • Get a good night’s sleep before traveling

To reinforce the point, here’s a helpful infographic from the Governor’s Office of Highway Safety:

(Click to enlarge)

In case you encounter inclement weather, carry an emergency kit that contains:

  • First-aid supplies
  • Blankets
  • Flashlight with spare batteries
  • Flares
  • A shovel
  • Quick-energy foods, nutrition bars, or dried fruits and nuts and water
  • Sand, salt or cat litter for traction

Fire Prevention

The 2014 National Fire Protection Association’s (NFPA) National Fire Prevention Week is October 5 – 11.  This year’s theme is: “Working Smoke Alarms Save Lives.”  Below are some fast facts on fire prevention and workplace safety from the Department of Administrative Services (DOAS) Risk Management Services Division.

SMOKE ALARMS:

  • Smoke alarms cut the risk of dying in a reported fire in half.
  • Roughly two-thirds of home fire deaths happen in homes with no smoke alarms or no working smoke alarms.  About one in five smoke alarm failures was due to dead batteries.
  • In fires considered large enough to activate the smoke alarm, hardwired alarms operated 91% of the time, while battery powered alarms operated only 75% of the time.
  • In more than half of the reported home fires in which the smoke alarms were present, but did not operate even though the fire was large enough, batteries were missing or disconnected. Nuisance alarms were the leading reason for disconnected alarms.
  • More than half of the smoke alarms found in reported fires and two-thirds of the alarms  found in homes with fire deaths were powered by battery only.
  • Interconnected smoke alarms on all floors increase safety.

ESCAPE PLANNING:

  • Almost three-quarters of Americans do have an escape plan; however, less than half actually practice it.
  • One-third of Americans’ households who made an escape plan thought they would have at least 6 minutes before a fire in their home would become life threatening. The time available is often less. Only 8% said their first thought on hearing a smoke alarm would be to get out!

CAUSES OF FIRE:

  • Cooking is the #1 cause of home fires and injuries.
  • Smoke inhalation is the leading cause of fire deaths.
  • Heating is the second leading cause of home fires, fire deaths and fire injuries.
  • 53% of home electrical fires involved other known types of equipment, including ranges, washers/dryers, fans and space heaters.

Let’s work together to make Georgia a safer place to work!